Guide MEDIC!!! (WIP)

Fantasia

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So as an add-on to Jaded's post, I'll post what I know over the years of researching and playing Medical professionals and Field Medics. Note that I am not a medical professional myself, just someone with no life and a lot of time to research things. This guide will cover doctors, specializations, and Navy Corpsmen in particular and what knowledge they'd have. For military experiences, lifestyles, etc. for Corpsmen, reference So You Want to Play Soldier?. As a note, remember that you don't need to go so in-depth into your roleplay that you could be an actual doctor because frankly, a lot of players don't want to roleplay out the tediousness that is full detail Medical RP. This first post will detail procedures, conditions, and problems one might face. The following posts will be for professional and unprofessional fixes for these issues.
First Aid/CPR: We'll start off with the basics which would be CPR and First Aid. Anyone could learn these and take classes on these whether it be online or in-person though of course, hands-on experience is far better than any online class. First Aid is used for short term care and to take care of minor injuries. Anything more serious such as second-degree burns, fractured limbs, amputations, etc. should be taken care of by a Doctor with long-term care. I'm not going to list the entire course here because it'd just be easier to send a link to a class you can read over for free without the test at the end. Click here for the Lessons.

Other Basics: If you've finished the CPR reading, you can skip this section. This is for those that don't want to go so far into depth outside of knowing the bare-bones basics about CPR and First Aid.
  1. Cleanliness - Cleanliness is a big priority when it comes to caring for a patient. Whether they have open wounds or just a sickness, you want to ensure that everything is as clean as possible, preferably using some form of sterilization. If the usual disinfectant or iodine isn't available, drinking liquor of high proof can work well enough though it's not nearly as good as proper disinfecting methods. You also need to make sure that you're wearing gloves; any open wounds or sores coming in contact with blood could easily get you infected with a sick patient's diseases or vice versa; keeping around Nitrile or rubber gloves is the best option as Latex allergy is a very real thing. Before and after donning these gloves, ensure you've washed your hands in some manner of course because bacteria and other nasty things can transfer onto gloves even at the slightest touch around the edges. If you're in a situation, however, where the patient will die if you take the time to wash your hands, go ahead and tend to them if you're sure they're not infected. TL;DR - Wash your hands, you dirty boys and girls and make sure you sterilize, sterilize, sterilize unless they're going to die in the next 30 seconds.
  2. ABC's - The ABC's of CPR are not so anymore. In 2010, the AHA made the order C-A-B which means Chest Compressions, Airway, and Breathing. I'm just including this part in case some people have outdated CPR training and figured they knew everything in the CPR part and didn't want to read it.
  3. Remain Calm - You'd think this one would be one everyone knows but it does need to be stated. You can't help anyone with shaky hands or anxiety attacks. If you're unable to handle the site of gore or blood, the medical profession is not for you, boys and girls. A good medic needs to be able to keep as clear a head as possible, be able to make snap decisions in order to preserve the life of the patient, and also give orders to anyone aiding the medic in the procedure.
Overview
'I swear by Apollo the Physician and Asclepius, and Hygieia and Panacea and all the gods and goddesses as my witnesses, that, according to my ability and judgment, I will keep this Oath and this contract:

To hold him who taught me this art equally dear to me as my parents, to be a partner in life with him, and to fulfill his needs when required; to look upon his offspring as equals to my own siblings, and to teach them this art, if they shall wish to learn it, without fee or contract; and that by the set rules, lectures, and every other mode of instruction, I will impart a knowledge of the art to my own sons, and those of my teachers, and to students bound by this contract and having sworn this Oath to the law of medicine, but to no others.

I will use those dietary regimens which will benefit my patients according to my greatest ability and judgment, and I will do no harm or injustice to them.

I will not give a lethal drug to anyone if I am asked, nor will I advise such a plan; and similarly I will not give a woman a pessary to cause an abortion.

In purity and according to divine law will I carry out my life and my art.

I will not use the knife, even upon those suffering from stones, but I will leave this to those who are trained in this craft.

Into whatever homes I go, I will enter them for the benefit of the sick, avoiding any voluntary act of impropriety or corruption, including the seduction of women or men, whether they are free men or slaves.

Whatever I see or hear in the lives of my patients, whether in connection with my professional practice or not, which ought not to be spoken of outside, I will keep secret, as considering all such things to be private.

So long as I maintain this Oath faithfully and without corruption, may it be granted to me to partake of life fully and the practice of my art, gaining the respect of all men for all time. However, should I transgress this Oath and violate it, may the opposite be my fate.'

Non-Military Medical professionals often have some of the hardest and most stressful occupations out there. The doctors to the EMT's, Nurses, and other staff work hard in order to save lives day in and day out. Military Medical workers may not have Medical school education, they either work in stressful hospitals on land and sea or in highly dangerous and hostile territory, working alongside Marine Battalions that treat them as honorary Marines.


The Professions

Paramedics answer emergency calls by rushing over to assist an individual with a medical issue. They must be prepared to help someone in need of first-aid or someone whose life may be at risk. This makes for a very stressful work environment, where paramedics must be ready for anything and available to work in a variety of conditions. They must act quickly and problem-solve to ensure they are giving the best medical care in the quickest amount of time. In addition, they must be able to have compassion towards patients, as it can be a very stressful situation for everyone involved. In addition to excellent medical skills, paramedics must be able to communicate effectively, listen carefully to how a patient describes their illness or injury, and then also report to the medical facility about any care provided while on the way. Paramedics typically go through about two years of training before completing an exam to be certified as an Emergency Medical Technician.
Nurses typically work with patients in medical facilities or in a patient's home. While they can work in emergency situations, many nurses work directly with patients to manage their medical care. Nurses are responsible for documenting a patient's medical history, noting symptoms, and developing a course of treatment. Nurses may work long and irregular hours. They must be able to recognize changes in a patient's health and act accordingly to help. Nurses must also be very organized, as they usually work with many different patients at the same time with different injuries or illnesses. Nurses can advance in their careers into supervisory roles. The nurses also know far, far more about medications, their interactions, and interference than a doctor does. Nurses are also known to be opened up to more, trusted, and more often than not, know the patient better than the doctors too.
One can specialize as a nurse in several positions listed below:
  • Oncology Nurse
  • School (Elementary/Secondary/etc.) Nurse
  • Radiology Nurse
  • Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner
  • Cardiovascular Nurse
  • Labor and Delivery Nurse
  • Pediatric Nurse
  • Dialysis Nurse
  • Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) Nurse
  • Staff Nurse
  • Nurse Manager
  • Telemetry Nurse
  • Nursing Assistant
  • Clinical Nurse Specialist
  • Post-Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) Nurse
  • Nurse Case Manager
  • Home Health Nurse
  • Operating Room (OR) Nurse
  • Emergency Room Nurse
  • Medical-Surgical Nurse
  • Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Nurse
  • Nurse Practitioner
  • Travel Nurse
  • Licensed Practical Nurse
  • Registered Nurse (RN)
Doctors are next on the list. Their training typically lasts several years and continues on even after their schooling. This training is called a residency where they work under a senior clinician who supervises and trains recent graduates from medical school for a certain amount of time until they're experienced and practiced enough to graduate to a full professional in their field. The following list includes several medical specializations and the typical length of their residency at the bare minimum before becoming a professional.

Anesthesiology3 years plus PGY-1 Transitional/Preliminary
Dermatology3 years plus PGY-1 Transitional/Preliminary
Emergency Medicine3-4 years
Family Practice3 years
General Surgery5 years
Internal Medicine3 years
Neurology3 years plus PGY-1 Transitional/Preliminary
Neurosurgery7 years
Obstetrics/Gynecology4 years
Ophthalmology3 years plus PGY-1 Transitional/Preliminary
Orthopedic Surgery5 years (includes one year of general surgery)
Otolaryngology5 years
Pathology4 years
Pediatrics3 years
Physical Medicine3-4 years
Plastic Surgery6 years
Psychiatry4 years
Radiation Oncology4 years plus PGY-1 Transitional/Preliminary
Radiology, Diagnostic4 years plus PGY-1 Transitional/Preliminary
Transitional/Preliminary1 year
Urology5 years (includes one year of general surgery)

The following link also includes 20 different types of Physicians that are in high demand and brief explanations of their jobs. 20 Types of Physicians in High Demand
Here are going to be several links you can read up on Navy Hospital Corpsmen and Combat Medics. Note I'm not an expert but these are some of the links I used when playing my own Navy Field Medic.
What do Navy Corpsmen Do?
Different Types of Combat Medics
Combat Hospital Corpsman Jobs
As someone who's roleplayed a Nurse, Doctor, and Medical Corpsman, I've seen a lot of people who don't know how to properly roleplay wounds, bleeding, shock, and blood loss. I'm not blaming everyone that didn't know how to, I'm just going to offer a guide to help those who are wounded to understand the effects on the body different injuries cause if they've never looked into it or experienced it themselves.

  • Burns:
  • Stab Wounds:
  • Internal Bleeding: Symptoms of having Internal Bleeding include but aren't limited to a pale complexion, profuse sweating, a rapid weak pulse, decreased alertness, and bleeding from orifices (openings) of the body that do not normally bleed like your eyes, nose, mouth, ears, etc. Vomiting and coughing up blood is also another sign depending on the type of internal bleeding.
  • Amputation: When it comes to amputation, you simply can't be Billy Bad Ass and tank it like the Terminator. Even the toughest of individuals will experience shock and extreme agony from an amputation without anesthesia. Keep in mind, Shock can kill you no matter how high your pain tolerance or how quickly you stop bleeding. Even if you survive the procedure itself (whether with or without anesthesia), you still have to contend with healing. The wound that comes after has to be carefully watched, cleaned, and dressed frequently. Infection can set in in a heartbeat and that's the curtain call for you, buddy. Even after, you'll feel pain and perhaps even experience what they call Phantom pains and limbs where you still feel pain as if you have pain in your amputated limb or as if it's still there. These pains or movements can sometimes even be felt years after an amputation.
  • Shock:
  • Blood Loss:
  • Bullet Wounds:
  • Lodged Items: For lodged items in the body, it really depends on the item; its size, shape, location, and surface (rough, smooth, jagged, etc.). You can use your judgment as to what would cause your character pain as everyone has a different threshold on top of adrenaline in the moment often causing the area to be numb to pain for a short time. Sometimes, the object even severs nerves and renders feeling in limbs (if it is between a limb and the body) useless.
  • Infection: In a world without modern medicine or a severe lack of medical supplies and staff, infections will be one of the big killers after the undead, animals, and other survivors. Infections are no joke and need to be taken care of as soon as possible before the infection spreads to the bloodstream. You can identify an infection often by a surplus of blood flow to an area, strange smells coming from the wound, pus, black tissue, severely red and hot skin around the area, and of course, a lot of pain.
  • Sickness and Fever:
  • Blunt Trauma/Crushing Wounds:
  • Car Crashes
  • Fractures
  • Electrical injuries
  • Dislocations
  • Sprains
  • Eye injuries
  • Ear injuries
  • Ulcers
  • Concussions
Common Medical Problems One Might Encounter as a Medic in the Zombie Apocalypse
The following list details what certain common conditions might entail and some very basic fixes. More detailed instructions will be listed in the following posts.
  • Burns:
  • Stab Wounds:
  • Internal Bleeding: Internal bleeding is a silent killer that most people wouldn't think of. This bleeding is inside the body, particularly in the chest cavity, belly cavity, or muscles and may be caused by major trauma such as blunt force, car accidents, falls, or even punches.
  • Amputation: It's not just the bites from the infected that might require a limb to be amputated. sometimes limbs are straight cut off, blown off, crushed or so severely damaged by other sources such as Necrosis that they need to be removed in order to save the patient. Amputations require special tools and are ideally done with anesthesia in order to prevent the patient from experiencing Shock (See Below). Not just any saw can be used for amputations as the trauma to the sight might be very well too much for the patient to survive. Gigli Saws are what is mainly used in the process of amputating limbs whether it be
  • Shock:
  • Blood Loss:
  • Bullet Wounds:
  • Foreign Objects: For foreign objects in the body, it really depends on the item; its size, shape, location, and surface (rough, smooth, jagged, etc.). A lot of these items you can figure out through common sense based on the shape of an item like, say, a stinger or splinter for example. Others may be more tricky and will require some creativity on your part to figure out how to remove or someone or something to guide you. More often than not, you can likely just skip detail with this and roleplay out a careful extraction and you're good. More Info on Foreign Objects
  • Infection: In a world without modern medicine or a severe lack of medical supplies and staff, infections will be one of the big killers after the undead, animals, and other survivors. Infections are no joke and need to be taken care of as soon as possible before the infection spreads to the bloodstream.
  • Sickness and Fever:
  • Blunt Trauma/Crushing Wounds: Again, this depends on the location and severity of the crush or blunt trauma. Sometimes when limbs are crushed, they are too far beyond saving and not amputating would cause necrosis (death of tissue due to injury or loss of blood supply.
  • Car Crashes
  • Fractures
  • Electrical injuries
  • Dislocations
  • Sprains
  • Eye injuries
  • Ear injuries
  • Ulcers
  • Concussions
 
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Fantasia

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PO1 Wilson's Procedural Guide for Medical Treatment

Considering the lack of medically trained individuals will dwindle in the days, months, and years to come, I've left these instructions along with my other notes in order to better inform the general public of what is necessary to keep themselves alive should my untimely demise come to pass. To those that find this journal; be aware that these notes will be the difference between life and death for dozens and if you are the kind of person I hope you to be, you will be an aspiring medic or doctor after the world we used to know went FUBAR and wish to save lives. I give you all of the knowledge I've collected over my 19 weeks of Hospital Corpsman training, 8 weeks of FMTB, and two tours, and even some knowledge I've gathered throughout my travels thus far. All I ask is that you share that knowledge with others and not horde it for yourself. Protect my writings with your life and ensure they are never permanently destroyed.

Best of Luck,

PO1 Harriet Wilson


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Fantasia

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Doc Willy's Quick Fixin' Guide
Hey there, y'all. I'm gonna be teachin' you some quicker ways t' do this crap th' Petty Officer's mentionin' above. I've learned that even if 'er proper technique's th' best way t' do it, sometimes ya just don't got what she's got and need t' get some quick fixin's goin' t' save uncle Robbie's life. Without further ado, here's m' guide t' savin' lives and kickin' ass, all while takin' a dip into the moonshine yer usin' t' clean shit because who th' fuck else is gonna save their life if not th' designated driver? (I'm shittin' ya, don't drink the moonshine. I'm watchin' you.)


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